The purpose of this Tribal Environmental Plan (TEP) is to outline tribally
identified environmental and public health concerns, set priorities, and forge
comprehensive solutions for future years. Our community needs a holistic environmental
approach linking together public and private stakeholders to work toward achieving
long-term ecosystem health.

The information in this TEP will assist Santa Rosa Rancheria and EPA to target its
resources to support tribal environmental program development.

Environmental Concerns

The Plan

Section I

Issue of Concern #1

Solid Waste Management Protection Policies

Santa Rosa Rancheria has good waste disposal from the Western Waste Company. Past
methods of disposal were necessary in the past but now we need to plan for the future.
We can reduce the amount of Solid Waste. We can recycle. With a Solid Waste Management
Plan and Codes and Ordinances we can help solve the Solid Waste problems in our
country.

1. Recommendations (desired results in 3-5 years)

  • Remove the dump
  • Prevent inappropriate dumping
  • Develop a Recycling Center
  • Develop Solid Waste Plan, including solid waste pickup and recycling
    program.

2. Key Personnel

  • Tribal community
  • Tribal council & administrator
  • Tribal environmental staff
  • Staff for Recycling

3. Action Required

  • Report dump site to the Indian Health Service
  • Report dump site to Environmental Protection Agency
  • Report dump site to Bureau of Indian Affairs
  • The IHS, EPA, and BIA together can remove the dump site.
  • Do a cost study to determine if it would be a good idea to do our own solid waste pickup, and recycling.
  • Gain community support for this project before beginning.
  • Apply for assistance to start a Recycling center
  • Develop Codes and Ordinances

4. Projected Assistance from EPA, ITC, IHS, BIA and others:

  • Technical/training
  • Training in solid waste management
  • Training for Recycling programs
  • pollution prevention training
  • Training in general environmental programs

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Issue of Concern #2

Soil quality (toxic salt levels)

We have some of the poorest land in the valley. We have about 1,100 acres of land to
farm and it is high in salts and alkali. Water is high in demand and the irrigation
wells and pumps are old and in disrepair. A direct plan of action needs to be
developed.

1. Recommendations (desired results in 3-5 years)

  • To farm approximately 1,100 acres
  • To complete a plan of action to restore and correct the soil structure
  • Acquire equipment needed to farm
  • Acquire expertise for "best management practices"
  • Proper irrigation

2. Key Personnel

  • Farm Foreman and staff
  • Tribal council & administrator
  • Tribal environmental staff
  • USDA, Consultants, local farmers, and local farm AG meetings

3. Action Required

  • Decide and list the equipment needed, and maintenance schedule
  • Develop a plan of action schedule for each crop
  • Train workers in agriculture practices
  • List of experts, and suppliers
  • Implement irrigation for crops
  • Develop complete Resource Management Systems

4. Projected Assistance from EPA, USDA and others

  • Technical/training
  • Development of Resource Management Systems
  • Pesticide Management
  • Pollution prevention training
  • Training in general environmental conservation.

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Issue of Concern #3

Surface/Groundwater quality and quantity Protection Policies

We need to define our practical irigable acreage (PIA) water resources need to be
determined. We need to define our water needs for now. We need to define our water
needs for the future. What is the quality and quantity of our Groundwater? Can we
secure more water through water rights disputes?

1. Recommendations (desired results in 3-5 years)

  • Chart the quality and quantity of all water
  • Settle all water rights disputes
  • Codes and ordinances protecting our water
  • Complete a Storm Water Plan
  • Proper irrigation and water conservation practices
  • Set buffer around the wetlands area (slough)

2. Key Personnel

  • Farm Foreman and staff
  • Tribal council & administrator
  • Tribal environmental staff
  • USDA, Consultants, local farmers, and local farm AG meetings
  • Last Chance Ditch
  • Government, state, county, local, agencies and GIS information
  • Universities and colleges

3. Action Required

  • Use 106 grant to develop a water information bank.
  • Train workers in agriculture practices to prevent point source pollution.
  • Develop and implement codes and ordinances protecting our water
  • Develop a GIS mapping system to chart all water information.
  • Equipment and technology
  • Develop an Emergency Response Plan and team.
  • Develop a Groundwater and Pesticide Plan.
  • Develop a wetlands buffer ordinance/protection for our wetlands.

4. Projected Assistance from EPA, IHS, USDA and others

  • Technical/training
  • Surface water training
  • Ground water and Pesticide Management
  • Watershed Academy
  • Training in general environmental programs
  • Emergency Response
  • Underground Storage tanks

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Issue of concern #4

Soil contamination by toxic substances Policies

If any vehicle dumps a hazardous substance on our land, by accident or on purpose we
need to have a plan of action that will clean up the spill. We need a plan of action
that places the cost of clean-up on the responsible party.

1. Recommendations (desired results in 3-5 years)

  • Keep and inventory of any substances that can harm the soil if spilled.
  • Complete a plan of action to insure that harmful substances will not be spilled.
  • Put in place a clean up plan to insure quick and complete action to minimize and
    clean up areas that spills have occurred.

2. Key Personnel

  • Tribal council & administrator
  • Tribal environmental staff
  • All users of products that can be harmful to the soil.

3. Action Required

  • Create a Chemical Emergency Response Notification Plan
  • Decide and list the equipment needed, and maintenance schedule if spill occurs.
  • Inventory all substances, including MSDS
  • Insure proper spill containment for all liquid contaminates such as oil, fuel ect.
  • Train workers/staff on reporting spill procedures
  • Work with fire department and local response agencies in Kings County.

4. Projected Assistance from EPA

  • Pollution prevention training
  • Training Chemical Emergency Response
  • Safety and Hazardous Material certification

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Issue of concern #5

Drinking water quality Policies

We need to follow the guidelines of the Safe Drinking Water Act. to ensure that our
water is good. We need our own policies and procedure, and Codes and Ordinances to
protect our water. We need to report to the community a report on the water
quality.

1. Recommendations (desired results in 3-5 years)

  • Chart the quality and quantity of all water for future water needs using GIS
  • Explore new systems for improving he secondary quality of drinking water i.e. ozonation/etc.
  • Settle all ground water rights disputes
  • Use Codes and ordinances to protecting our water quality and quantity
  • Report to the community the quality of water for each water well.
  • Insure proper water conservation practices
  • Insure proper drinking water testing procedures in accordance with Federal Guidelines.
  • Develop Santa Rosa Rancheria guidelines, policies and procedures.
  • Insure a residue chlorine reaches to the entire water system to combat coliform bacteria.

2. Key Personnel

  • Tribal council & administrator
  • Wastewater treatment operator
  • IHS & EPA
  • Tribal environmental staff
  • Government, NACD USDA, state, county, local, agencies and GIS information
  • Universities and colleges

3. Action Required

  • Use 106 grant to develop a water information bank.
  • Develop a report for the community
  • Develop and implement codes and ordinances protecting our water
  • Develop a GIS mapping system to chart all water information and well head protection.
  • Plan for future (10 year) plan for effective drinking water delivery
  • Test for a chlorine residual in the drinking water system.

4. Projected Assistance from EPA, IHS and RCAC:

  • Technical/training from EPA and RCAC
  • Drinking water Tribal Set-Aside Grants
  • Community outreach for protecting drinking water resources using UDSA education services and other training materials

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Issue of concern #6

Air quality protection Policies

What is in the air we breath? We need to monitor the quality of our air.If our air
quality changes we need to detect it and find the source of contamination and stop the
pollution. We need to build up an information bank that documents the quality of our
air so our facts can be used as evidence in court. If we monitor our own air we will
have a much larger vote when or if a large air polluter wants to locate near us. Our
community needs to control what we put in the air. We need our own codes and
ordinance.

1. Recommendations (desired results in 3-5 years)

  • Investigate the air quality at Santa Rosa Rancheria, for the implementation, maintenance and enforcement of the national standards, in Clean Air Act.
  • Establish a Air Quality Monitoring Station.
  • Use Codes and ordinances to protecting our air quality.
  • Establish a burn policy.
  • Establish Permits and guidelines for source polluters.
  • Settle the credits purchase understanding
  • Comment on any new source polluters that have an impact here.
  • Do an emissions inventory post information with GIS

2. Key Personnel

  • Tribal council & administrator
  • Tribal environmental staff
  • Tribes, Government, state, county, local, agencies and GIS/web information
  • Universities and colleges

3. Action Required

  • Establish a burn policy in the community
  • Complete an Clean Air Act Grant from ยง105 application.
  • Establish information on all criteria pollutants
  • Develop and implement codes and ordinances protecting our air.
  • Develop a GIS mapping system to chart all air pollutant sources
  • Develop a Air Monitoring station, once established, our comments on future source pollutes will have much more weight.

4. Projected Assistance from EPA

  • Technical/training from EPA and ITEP
  • 105 grant, to assist in planning developing, establishing, improving, and maintaining air quality.
  • Community outreach for protecting drinking water resources.

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Issue of concern #7

Dog immunization/licencing programs and Policies

Our pets that roam free can get in all kinds of situations and get all kinds of
disease. We need to take care of our pets. The new fencing is helping a lot by keeping
the pets at home. We need to protect our community from pets that are not properly
taken care of.

1. Recommendations (desired results in 3-5 years)

  • Disease free pets
  • Pass a leash law.
  • Loose animals prevention, security involvement

2. Key Personnel

  • Tribal council & administrator
  • Tribal environmental staff
  • IHS, local authorities/security

3. Action Required

  • Fences for yards
  • Develop a leash law
  • Gain community support
  • Train security to keep an eye out for which dogs are running loose, are they stray?
  • Develop and promote an immunization program which is easy for the community to follow and healthy for the dogs.

4. Projected Assistance from local county and community:

  • Tribal council & administrator
  • Tribal environmental staff IHS
  • IHS & Local dog pound
  • Army Veterinary at NAS Lemoore

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Issue of concern #8

Culturally significant plants

Plants and there uses have been taught through the generations. Can we grow and tend to
the plants we know and care so much for?

1. Recommendations (desired results in 3-5 years)

  • Restore Cultural Plants for gathering
  • Pass Codes and Ordinances protecting the Culture
  • Tending training for tribal members.

2. Key Personnel

  • Tribal council & administrator
  • Tribal environmental staff
  • Natural Resources Conservation Service
  • Tribal Members

3. Action Required

  • Plant culturally significant plants.
  • Gather a list of important plants
  • Gain community support
  • Protect gathers by using an active Pesticide Plan
  • Join groups like the California Basket Weavers Association.
  • Active Tending Program.

4. Projected Assistance from USDA

  • Natural Resources Conservation Service (provide plant material and experts)
  • Community funds

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Grants

Section II

EPA Environmental Education Grants Program

Supports projects to design, demonstrate, or disseminate practices, methods, or techniques related to environmental education and training.

Funding: $3,000,000 in grants estimated for 1995. 25 percent of all funds obligated under this program are for grants of not more than $5,000.

Eligibility: Local education agency, college or university, state education agency or environmental agency; and nonprofit organizations.

Application: Applications have usually been announced in April and due in October. Applicants should contact their EPA regional office for an application package.

EPA Environmental Justice Small Grant Program

Provides financial assistance to small community groups. Funds can be used for environmental justice education programs, local clean-up efforts, and technical assistance.

Funding: $1,000,000 to $3,000,000 expected nationally in 1996. Each EPA region may be given up to $300,000 to award at a maximum of $20,000 each recipient.

Eligibility: Tribal governments and affected small community groups. Must be a nonprofit organization.

Application: Applications are available beginning in October 1995 and must be returned by February 4, 1996. Awards will be announced by the end of May 1996.

EPA Climate Change Action Plan

Provides funding for activities that bring about a significant reduction in emission of greenhouse gases, specifically source reduction, recycling, and composting projects.

Funding: The funding level for 1996 is subject to Congressional allocation.

Eligibility: State, tribal, local government agencies, universities, and private non-profit agencies. Joint projects between nonprofit and for-profit entities are encouraged.

Application: A solicitation was released in September and closed in October 1995. Please contact regional EPA offices for information on release of future solicitations.

EPA Environmental Justice through Pollution Prevention Grant Program

Provides financial assistance to community groups for projects that address environmental justice and use pollution prevention as the proposed solution.

Funding: $4,200,000 available nationally in 1995; $400,00 was awarded in Region 9. Organizations can request up to $100,000 per grant.

Eligibility: Incorporated nonprofit or grass-roots organizations; city, county, or local government organizations; or federally recognized tribal governments.

Application: Applicants should contact the appropriate EPA regional office for applications and additional information.

EPA Jobs Through Recycling Initiative

Provides grants to stimulate the development of recycling and reuse businesses that:

  • Increase the use of recyclable or reusable materials;
  • Contribute to economic development and job creation/retention;
  • Reduce disposal of materials that generate greenhouse gases.

Funding: The funding level for 1996 is subject to Congressional allocation. A 25 percent grantee match is required.

Eligibility: States, tribes and multi-state organizations.

Application: A solicitation was released in mid-December 1995 and applications are due in February 1996.

EPA Solid Waste Management Assistance Grants (RCRA 8001)

Promotes use of integrated solid waste management systems to solve municipal solid waste generation and management problems at the local, regional, and national levels.

Funding: The award budget for each regional office in 1995 was approximately $200,000.

Eligibility: Nonprofit entities including federal and state authorities, public and private organizations, and tribal governments.

Application: Requests for application forms and submittal of completed applications should be directed to the appropriate EPA regional office. Deadlines vary from region to region.

EPA Sustainable Development Challenge Grants

Provides seed money to stimulate public/private investment in long-term community-based, community-implemented strategies that improve both environmental quality and economic vitality. This program is still under development.

Funding: Program funding is subject to Congressional allocation. EPA hopes to fund a total of 10-15 projects nationally.

Eligibility: Local governments and non-profit organizations.

Application: Please contact EPA regional offices for information.

Other funding sources: California Recycling, Public Education and Litter Reduction Grant Program

Supports job creation and economic development through (1) creation of markets for post-consumer beverage container material and (2) increased beverage container recycling through collection and education programs. The California Beverage Container Recycling and Litter Reduction Act requires the Department of Conservation to annually expend $2,000,000 in grants to nonprofit organizations and government entities.

Funding: $2,000,000 in grants awarded each year.

Eligibility: California based tax-exempt organizations and government entities.

Application: Applications are accepted on a continuous basis.

California Used Oil Research and Demonstration Project Grant Program

Awards grants to research, testing or demonstration projects that develop collection technologies and/or uses for recycled or used lubricating oil.

Funding: Approximately $1,500,000 was available in 1994.

Eligibility: Individuals, businesses eligible to do business in California, local governments, and other public agencies, non-profit organizations, colleges and universities.

Application: Applications available in February of odd years and are due in June. The next round is anticipated to begin in 1997. Applications will be available from the California Integrated Waste Management Board.

Supports projects to design, demonstrate, or disseminate practices, methods, or techniques related to environmental education and training.

Funding: $3,000,000 in grants estimated for 1995. 25 percent of all funds obligated under this program are for grants of not more than $5,000.

Eligibility: Local education agency, college or university, state education agency or environmental agency; and nonprofit organizations.

Application: Applications have usually been announced in April and due in October. Applicants should contact their EPA regional office for an application package.

EPA Environmental Justice Small Grant Program

Provides financial assistance to small community groups. Funds can be used for environmental justice education programs, local clean-up efforts, and technical assistance.

Funding: $1,000,000 to $3,000,000 expected nationally in 1996. Each EPA region may be given up to $300,000 to award at a maximum of $20,000 each recipient.

Eligibility: Tribal governments and affected small community groups. Must be a nonprofit organization.

Application: Applications are available beginning in October 1995 and must be returned by February 4,1996. Awards will be announced by the end of May 1996.

EPA Climate Change Action Plan

Provides funding for activities that bring about a significant reduction in emission of greenhouse gases, specifically source reduction, recycling, and composting projects.

Funding: The funding level for 1996 is subject to Congressional allocation.

Eligibility: State, tribal, local government agencies, universities, and private non-profit agencies. Joint projects between nonprofit and for-profit entities are encouraged.

Application: A solicitation was released in September and closed in October 1995. Please contact regional EPA offices for information on release of future solicitations.

EPA Environmental Justice through Pollution Prevention Grant Program

Provides financial assistance to community groups for projects that address environmental justice and use pollution prevention as the proposed solution.

Funding: $4,200,000 available nationally in 1995; $400,00 was awarded in Region 9. Organizations can request up to $100,000 per grant.

Eligibility: Incorporated nonprofit or grass-roots organizations; city, county, or local government organizations; or federally recognized tribal governments.

Application: Applicants should contact the appropriate EPA regional office for applications and additional information.

EPA Jobs Through Recycling Initiative

Provides grants to stimulate the development of recycling and reuse businesses that:

  • Increase the use of recyclable or reusable materials;
  • Contribute to economic development and job creation/retention;
  • Reduce disposal of materials that generate greenhouse gases.

Funding: The funding level for 1996 is subject to Congressional allocation. A 25 percent grantee match is required.

Eligibility: States, tribes and multi-state organizations.

Application: A solicitation was released in mid-December 1995 and applications are due in February 1996.

EPA Solid Waste Management Assistance Grants (RCRA 8001)

Promotes use of integrated solid waste management systems to solve municipal solid waste generation and management problems at the local, regional, and national levels.

Funding: The award budget for each regional office in 1995 was approximately $200,000.

Eligibility: Nonprofit entities including federal and state authorities, public and private organizations, and tribal governments.

Application: Requests for application forms and submittal of completed applications should be directed to the appropriate EPA regional office. Deadlines vary from region to region.

EPA Sustainable Development Challenge Grants

Provides seed money to stimulate public/private investment in long-term community-based, community-implemented strategies that improve both environmental quality and economic vitality. This program is still under development.

Funding: Program funding is subject to Congressional allocation. EPA hopes to fund a total of 10-15 projects nationally.

Eligibility: Local governments and non-profit organizations.

Application: Please contact EPA regional offices for information.

Other Funding Sources: California Recycling, Public Education and Litter Reduction Grant Program

Supports job creation and economic development through (1) creation of markets for post-consumer beverage container material and (2) increased beverage container recycling through collection and education programs. The California Beverage Container Recycling and Litter Reduction Act requires the Department of Conservation to annually expend $2,000,000 in grants to nonprofit organizations and government entities.

Funding: $2,000,000 in grants awarded each year.

Eligibility: California based tax-exempt organizations and government entities.

Application: Applications are accepted on a continuous basis.

California Used Oil Research and Demonstration Project Grant Program

Awards grants to research, testing or demonstration projects that develop collection technologies and/or uses for recycled or used lubricating oil. Funding: Approximately $1,500,000 was available in 1994.

Eligibility: Individuals, businesses eligible to do business in California, local governments, and other public agencies, non-profit organizations, colleges and universities.

Application: Applications available in February of odd years and are due in June. The next round is anticipated to begin in 1997. Applications will be available from the California Integrated Waste Management Board.

1. Solid Waste Management Protection Policies 2. Soil quality (toxic salt levels) 3. Surface/Groundwater quality Protection Policies 4. Soil contamination by toxic substances Policies 5. Drinking water quality Policies 6. Air quality protection Policies 1. Burning trash 2. Burning tires 3. Burning wires 7. Chemical dumping Policies 8. Lack of recycling program Policies 9. Dog immunization/licencing programs and Policies 10. Culturally significant plants 11. Tree diseases 12. Train and work with Tribal Counsel and Community on Policies and procedures needed to protect the environment of the Rancheria.

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